Better Early: New Literacy Comment

Ann Marie Demers, a recent emigrant to our area, offers this
narrative in response to the earlier post and comments about
child literacy.  Many of the books she read I either read in my
earlier days, or our children were read to from them, especially
that series called the "Golden Books."
RJR
 Now from Ms. Demers:
Since I don't have children of my own, I'll have to comment on
being read to as a child.y mother, who was uneducated, having
 not even completed high school, but certainly not illiterate,
 used to read to me from the Little Golden Books.  She had an
 innate intelligence and would have made a wonderful teacher
had she been allowed to continue her education.  But I digress
My mother would read to me for hours on end from those Little
 Golden Books that were popular when I was a child in the 1950s.
  I don't know how many of those were ever published, but I
remember having many, many of those thin little books, so many
that I don't even really remember the stories now, after so
many years, but I loved every one of them.  When Mom offered
to read to me, I would go to the bookcase where my books were
stored  and pull out a large pile of them.  We would sit
snuggled together in my father's big reclining chair and she
would read until her voice became hoarse and she would finally
 say "Mommy can't read any more".  She read to me so often that
I was able to pull out a book and sit there and "read" to
myself, and without really being able to read -- I was still
too young at that point -- I could turn the pages at the exact
 point necessary.  To everyone's amazement, I had memorized the
 stories!
By our reading sessions, my mother instilled in me a love of
reading that has never waned.  I believe that the foundation
she gave me -- teaching me the alphabet, and some rudimentary
instruction in reading --  made the learning once I got to
school (at age 4 1/2) much easier.  She created an excitement
for learning new things.  Though I also read for fun -- books
like the Nancy Drew mystery series, the Bobbsey Twins series,
animal stories like Black Beauty and National Velvet -- much of
 my reading as a pre-teen was in subjects like anthropology,
astronomy, medicine, and the paranormal, interests that continue
 to this day.
Literacy is indeed an important skill for all of us, and
studies show that keeping the brain active into our golden
years can help to stave off diseases like Alheimer's.   We
should be "seekers of knowledge" all our lives.
Advertisements

7 Responses to “Better Early: New Literacy Comment”

  1. Tammy Stephens Says:

    Beautiful story!

  2. Ann Marie Demers Says:

    Well, now you’ve gone and embarrassed me !!!
    I did not expect my little comment to end up as a “front page” entry here !
    And while I’m embarrassed, I will admit that I’m flattered at the same time.
    So, thank you for spotlighting my little story.

    I hope you all enjoy it, whether it reminds you of your own childhood experience or because you now do something similar with your own children or grandchildren.

  3. Forest Crump Says:

    Learning is a life long endeavor 🙂

  4. John Candy Says:

    Great site, exactly what I was looking for, I can’t get your RSS feed to work right in google chrome though, is it on my end?

  5. Sarah Palin Says:

    Have you ever considered adding more videos to your blog posts to keep the readers more entertained? I mean I just read through the entire article of yours and it was quite good but since I’m more of a visual learner.

  6. Compost Says:

    Hello. This is kind of an “unconventional” question , but have other visitors asked you how get the menu bar to look like you’ve got it? I also have a blog and am really looking to alter around the theme, however am scared to death to mess with it for fear of the search engines punishing me. I am very new to all of this …so i am just not positive exactly how to try to to it all yet. I’ll just keep working on it one day at a time Thanks for any help you can offer here.

  7. Field Turf Says:

    Thanks for the great post! keep it coming 😉

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: