Archive for January, 2010

Who Let Dem Saint Bernards Out?

January 31, 2010

January 31, 2010

Some random notes from and about the passing scene. . . .

1.   Excitement builds as Super Bowl XLIV approaches.  Interest in this sporting event will probably overwhelm the interest in the Winter Olympics being held in British Columbia.  I have been to British Columbia in recent years and much enjoyed the beautiful scenery and the international flavor of Whistler, BC, where a number of the Alpine events will be staged.  But I do admit that we will likely be more absorbed in the Super Bowl.  We’ve been to New Orleans–twice–and to the Miami area several times, and got lost several years ago while attempting to travel from Indianapolis (home of the Colts) to Champaign, Illinois.  So we have some scattered impressions of the venues involved in the annual extravaganza.
We will be backing the underdog Saints because we know one of the former Saints players, who was a safety on the team (when it became, unfortunately, the “Aints”) during most of the 1980s.  His parents became good friends of ours in Neodesha, Kansas, in the early 1960s and still are.
Besides who can resist the appeal of the call to arms that the Saints fans have adopted: “Who dat say dey gonna beat dem Saints?”   “Who dat” will doubtless appear on a vast number of souvenir items, especially if dem Saints overcome the odds and win dat game!

2.   My immediate past posting about gaffes in the spelling of words (excellance/excellence, pubic/public, and Henry Gibson/Henrik Ibsen) was in part illustrated once again in a problem with a word in Sunday’s “Local and State” section.  Here is the complete sentence, about an artist who has found spiritual satisfaction in his wood sculptures (original column by Catherine Kozak of the Virginia-Pilot out of Norfolk):   “What began as an offer by Outer Banks artist Glenn Eure to create wood sculptures depicting the cruxification of Christ for his church turned out to be an emotionally wrenching marathon that tested his mettle and deepened his spirituality.”  Your two tasks: (1) identify the problem and (2) offer a correction, plus any exculpatory rationale that might in part get the reporter and the editors of our daily newspaper off the hook.

3.  Elder son offered to me this morning this interesting contribution, heard on WRAL-TV and spoken by a weather reporter, who observed that the problem with icy conditions would be around for “quite a little bit more longer.”   You betcha.

RJR

Advertisements

Oh, The Agony!

January 27, 2010

Once again, late this morning,  it came to my attention, unavoidably and perhaps inevitably.

Why?  Why do I keep coming across mistakes in spelling or malapropisms that could be or probably are an embarrassment to the publisher as well as to the intended audience.

In the late morning as we were coming into the “Country Fish Fry” in Hope Mills for our lunch,  the headline in the current issue,  just out today,  caught my eye and prompted a groan.    The front page’s cover pictured impressively the retiring President of Methodist University and had for a title this groaner:                        A LEGACY OF EXCELLANCE                               As James Thurber used to scrawl in the hallways of The New Yorker where he worked for several years,  “TOO LATE!  TOO LATE!  TOO LATE!”  Too late to correct this issue’s misspelling on the cover, for it was clear that distributions of  Up and Coming Weekly had already occurred. That a respected University’s heritage was the topic only made the gaffe that much more agonizing for all involved,  including the publication’s readers.

I was reminded of a couple of boo-boos of similar provenance and like embarrassment that took place on the campus of what is now “The University of North Carolina at Pembroke.”  One of these was seen in posted announcements not too long after the Chavis Student Center had been dedicated and put to full use:  “No Smoking in Pubic Areas of the Student Center.”   Aaaaaaarghhhhhh!

Another occurred in an announcement of tryouts for a play by a famous Norwegian playwright,  and it went something like this:  “Tryouts For A Doll’s House by Henry Gibson Will be Held [on such and such a date at such and at time]. ”  I believe that Henry Gibson was actually one of the actors in a satiric TVweekly series of that time: “Laugh-In.”

In sum,  somebuddy has to be carful about making carless misteaks!

RJR

Answer Key to “Tom Swiftlys, Part Deux”

January 27, 2010

Here, oh ye slothful and sluggish ones, is the answer key to my second posting re the “Tom Swifltlys”–-RJR

TOM SWIFTLYS REDUX, ROUND TWO

Here again, to commence, are five “punny” warm-up problems.  Your mission, should you be able to accept it, is to fill in the blank with an appropriate pun-word.

(1) A man walks into a bar with a slab of asphalt under his arm and says, “A beer, please, and one for the _ROAD___________.”
(2) Two hydrogen atoms walk into a bar.  One says, “I’ve lost my electron.”  The other says, “Are you sure?”  The first replies, “Yes, I’m _POSITIVE_____________.”
(3) A man went to a store the other day to buy some camouflage trousers, but he couldn’t __FIND ANY__________________.
(4) A three-legged dog came into a bar and started biting and clawing and barking up a storm at the patrons.  Finally they sent for the sheriff, who managed to corner and calm the dog.  Then he asked, “What is the matter with you, anyway?”  The dog answers, “I’m looking for the guy that _SHOT MY PAW_______________.”
(5) Medical doctors at a research hospital were assigned the task of finding a new treatment for constipation.  One learned from a friend about a witch doctor in the South American jungle who used some remedy that was apparently highly successful.  He returned triumphantly with a bundle of ferns. Skeptically, his fellow researchers said, “How can you be sure that this will work?”  Replied the researcher, “With _FRONDS_________ like these, who needs _ENEMAS_______________?”

And now, ten more “Tom Swiftly” challenges: Try first to supply an adverb that fits the situation set up in Tom’s sentence.  Your choice may be as good or better than mine.  To completely satisfy your curiosity, choose for any incomplete problems an adverb from the list following the sentences.
(6)   “Nurse, if you look real hard on that table, you just might find me the right scalpel,” said Dr. Tom _CUTTINGLY ___________________.
(7) “Sally, if I told you you had a great body, would you hold it against me?”  asked Tom _LUSTILY______________.”
(8) “Just look at how the steeple on that Congregational Church reaches toward Heaven,” observed Tom _INSPIRINGLY_____________.
(9) “Wow!  Is my bladder full!  Where’s the Men’s Room?”  queried Tom _YEARNINGLY_____________.
(10) “I sure could use another nip of that orange Gatorade,” hinted Tom __INSIPIDLY______________.
(11) “When I grow up, I’m going to have the biggest, best car in Springfield,” said Tom _WANTONLY________________.
(12) “I just can’t figure out how they got that little Jessica McClure out of that old well in Midland,” pondered Tom _DEEPLY_______________.
(13) “Bozo’s dug a hole under that fence, and I can’t find him!” whined Tom _PETULANTLY_____________.
(14) “Look out!  That grizzly’s getting our groceries out of the Suburban, warned Tom _INTENTLY_____________.
(15) “Gee, I hope Mom put my in-line skates in this beautiful little box,” said Tom __RAPTLY______________.

Sporting News: Changes in American English

January 27, 2010

The Sporting News:  Changes in American English

Among the fascinating aspects of major sports is the inventiveness of the players and fans and sports reporters in using the English language in a creative fashion.

They might, for example, borrow a more familiar image in order to simplify the team’s preparation for battle.  Playing sandlot football many years ago, for example, we would sometimes try the technique of the “Statue of Liberty” play, in which the quarterback would pull the ball past his ear and do a backwards handoff, or short pass, to a back running laterally behind him. It may have worked once or twice.  But I have not seen it used lately in an NCAA or a NFL game.  We have heard a great deal this year about the “wildcat” formation and continuing news about “screens” and “shovel passes” and so on.

Not much is said about the “reverse” or the “double reverse” or the “end around” anymore.  I suspect that as the defensive players have become bigger, stronger,  faster, and maybe even smarter, that these seldom work.

I have not yet learned how a“wildcat” play is set up and how it is supposed to work

I remember our high school team being suckered once by a “lonesome end” play.  Ten of the opponent’s team had come into a conventional huddle while one player hung back on the field near their bench, a pass was thrown to him, a touchdown recorded, and we lost the game.  I am not sure if that maneuver was legal then, but I do believe it is illegal now.  And I do know that all of the “Blue Rapids Pirates” were  upset about it.

“Blend words” are popular in many  kinds of entertainment in the mass media.  See, for example, words like “sitcom,” “podcast,” “infotainment” and “edutainment.”  Two interesting blend words used in college football (both relating to a special kind of “trick play”) are the “fumblerooski” and the “trickeration” plays, which are rarely, but sometimes very effectively, used.  A clever coach will have at least one in his repertoire for just the right moment.

Another device that is found fairly often in media entertainment is the tendency to put a word to work as a new part of speech.  An example from “Facebook” is the change from a noun to a verb: a new partner in a person’s circle is said to have been “friended.”  He or she is apparently also capable, if things sour in the relationship, to be “unfriended.”  Once unfriended perhaps an outcast may seek once more to be “befriended,” which is a verb in standard usage.

Here are a couple of examples of part of speech changes of words from the sports media.  One Dick Vitale (tired perhaps of using the trite terms “diaper dandy” and “PT”) may refer to a team’s tall inside players as “the bigs,” successfully changing an adjective into a noun.  A local sports writer, who thrives on following the recruiting trail in men’s NCAA basketball, especially in the ACC, refers to a recruit as a “commit,” changing a verb into a noun quite adeptly.  When the player decides he will not honor his verbal or written agreement, he will therefore become a “decommit,” really a nice twisting and turning (slowly, slowly in the wind), of the conventions of American English language. But change is, after all, is it not, what the history of a language is all about.

Comments on and additions to this post always welcome!

RJR

A Mother’s Love of Reading

January 24, 2010

As I get older and older and eventually, perhaps, very old, I will continue to cherish the lifelong love of reading that my parents, especially Mom, set by their example and their encouragement.

My mother, a fostered child who taught for several years in a one-room country school in the Kansas of the 1920s, married my father, ten years older, in May of 1929.  As any young woman of her generation would have done, she ended her professional career, became the helpmate of my father on his then-eighty-acre farm, raised three children, and endured much that made her stronger mentally and emotionally and physically.  In the time of wheat harvesting a work day extended from dawn, or before, to stark dark.  Mom was expected to provide four meals during the summer gathering-in as well as to do all the other chores among the animals and the vegetable garden and the potato field and wherever else needed.

After they sold the farm and retired, Mom began to find more time to read and as well to write usually several letters a week to friends and family members.  She often now, with more spare time, shared with me and others favorite poems or anecdotes she came across.  Her love of books and reading is shown in a poem by Janice James that she told our son Richard (as he was clandestinely collecting documents from all over to fit into an album he and his mother were preparing as recognition of my retirement in 1997.  Mom said this: “These lines fit Ray to a T.  He read many, many books from the school library or the city library.  Sometimes we attended a movie but he would rather stay home and read a good book”:
I’ve travelled the world twice over,
Met the famous: saints and sinners,
Poets and artists, kings and queens,
Old stars and hopeful beginners.
I’ve been where no-one’s been before,
Learned secrets from writers and cooks
All with one library ticket
To the wonderful world of books.

Today, if Mom were still here, I would call or write her about a book, a memoir, that I was reading and that I was enjoying very much, for it was the remembrances of a writer, who did not publish a book until he was sixty-six years old.  Frank McCourt’s story of his mother and their gritty lives in this country and then back again to live in Ireland, Angela’s Ashes, became not only a best-seller but also the winner of a Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Critics Award, and the L.A. Times Book Award.

The book by Mr. McCourt that I am reading now is his third.   And it is the story of his teaching for thirty years in the turbulent and oft-chaotic English classrooms of New York City.  One paragraph from Teacher Man, a book Mom would have deeply appreciated but also might have shuddered about at times, will be enough to whet your appetite:
Facing dozens of teenagers every day brings you down to earth.  At eight a.m. they don’t care how you feel.  You think of the day ahead: five classes, up to one hundred and seventy-five American adolescents; moody, hungry, in love, anxious, horny, energetic, challenging. No escape.  There they are and there you are with your headache, your indigestion, echoes of your quarrel with your spouse, lover, landlord, your pain-in-the-ass son who wants to be Elvis, who appreciates nothing you do for him.  You couldn’t sleep last night.  You still have that bag filled with the papers of the one hundred and seventy-five students, their so-called compositions, careless scrawls.  Oh, mister, did you read my paper?  Not that they care.  Writing compositions is not how they intend to spend the rest of their lives.  That’s something you do only in this boring class.  They’re looking at you.  You cannot hide. They’re waiting.  What are we doing today, teacher?  The paragraph?  Oh, yeah.   Hey, everybody, we gonna study the paragraph, the structure, topic sentence an’ all.  Can’t wait to tell my mom tonight.  She’s always asking how school was today.  Paragraphs, Mom.  Teacher has a thing about paragraphs.  Mom’ll say, Very nice, and go back to her soap opera.

Very nice, and I’m going back to the AFC Championship Game.

RJR

Tom Swiftlys Redux, Part Deux

January 22, 2010

TOM SWIFTLYS REDUX, ROUND TWO

Here again, to commence, are five “punny” warm-up problems.  Your mission, should you be able to accept it, is to fill in the blank with an appropriate pun-word.

(1) A man walks into a bar with a slab of asphalt under his arm and says, “A beer, please, and one for the ____________.”
(2) Two hydrogen atoms walk into a bar.  One says, “I’ve lost my electron.”  The other says, “Are you sure?”  The first replies, “Yes, I’m ______________.”
(3) A man went to a store the other day to buy some camouflage trousers, but he couldn’t ____________________.
(4) A three-legged dog came into a bar and started biting and clawing and barking up a storm at the patrons.  Finally they sent for the sheriff, who managed to corner and calm the dog.  Then he asked, “What is the matter with you, anyway?”  The dog answers, “I’m looking for the guy that ________________.”
(5) Medical doctors at a research hospital were assigned the task of finding a new treatment for constipation.  One learned from a friend about a witch doctor in the South American jungle who used some remedy that was apparently highly successful.  He returned triumphantly with a bundle of ferns. Skeptically, his fellow researchers said, “How can you be sure that this will work?”  Replied the researcher, “With __________ like these, who needs ________________?”

And now, ten more “Tom Swiftly” challenges: Try first to supply an adverb that fits the situation set up in Tom’s sentence.  Your choice may be as good or better than mine.  To completely satisfy your curiosity, choose for any incomplete problems an adverb from the list following the sentences.
(6)   “Nurse, if you look real hard on that table, you just might find me the right scalpel,” said Dr. Tom ____________________.
(7) “Sally, if I told you you had a great body, would you hold it against me?”  asked Tom _______________.”
(8) “Just look at how the steeple on that Congregational Church reaches toward Heaven,” observed Tom ______________.
(9) “Wow!  Is my bladder full!  Where’s the Men’s Room?”  queried Tom ______________.
(10) “I sure could use another nip of that orange Gatorade,” hinted Tom ________________.
(11) “When I grow up, I’m going to have the biggest, best car in Springfield,” said Tom _________________.
(12) “I just can’t figure out how they got that little Jessica McClure out of that old well in Midland,” pondered Tom ________________.
(13) “Bozo’s dug a hole under that fence, and I can’t find him!” whined Tom ______________.
(14) “Look out!  That grizzly’s getting our groceries out of the Suburban, warned Tom ______________.
(15) “Gee, I hope Mom put my in-line skates in this beautiful little box,” said Tom ________________.
Here are the adverbs that I used in these sentences, in random order:
yearningly     lustily     petulantly         raptly     intently     cuttingly      deeply     insipidly     inspiringly     wantonly

Have some fun!  I’ll post an answer key in a few days
P.S.  Shall we have a “blogger breakfast” a week from today?  That would be January 29.

RJR

Answer Key to Latest Mystery

January 21, 2010

Thursday Morning,  January 21 (Wet and Cold)

ANSWER KEY FOR “TOM SWIFTLYS REDUX”

I think we would have had many more responses if I could have formatted “WordPress” material more successfully.  Apologies for that.

ANYWAY: here are the answers.  And thanks to D. and to Tammy for their participation.

First, the five “warm-up” punnies:
(1) What do your call a “fish” with no eyes?  A fsh.
(2) Two peanuts walk into a rough biker bar.  One was a salted.
(3) A jumper cable walks into a bar.  The bartender says, “OK, I’ll serve you, but just don’t start anything.”
(4) A sandwich walks into a bar.  The bartender says, “Sorry, we don’t serve food in here.”
(5) A dyslexic man walks into a bra.

And now the “Tom Swiftly” Challenge # 1:
(6) “My Buick sedan ought to be just right to transport the Homecoming Queen in the parade, “ bragged Tom regally,
(7) What did you get on Old Lady Grisham’s spelling test?” asked Tom quizzically.
(8) “That cussed wind just knocked my Titleist clean over the green,” said Tom disgustedly.
(9) “Put me down for 100 margins on heating oil,” requested Tom bullishly.
(10) “Dammit, who locked that screen door again?” whined Tom restrainedly.
(11) “Lemme have that last slice of American cheese, or I’ll tell Mom it was you that broke her vase,” said Tom craftily.
(12) “I bet I’m going to fail that math exam,” whined Tom testily.
(13) “Buy some more IBM stock if it falls another half-point,” demanded Tom unbearably.
(14) “These railroad tracks could sure use some maintenance,” observer Tom shakily.
(15) “I just don’t feel right about scientists going all around trying to clone everything,” said Tom sheepishly.

Later. . . .
RJR

Tom Swiftlys Redux # 1

January 15, 2010

As promised in my earlier blog today,  I have decided that readers of–and contributors to–this blog site need some light entertainment,  of a “punny” kind, on occasion.  So here’s a start with some sentences that have amusing answers (source undetermined for the nonce).  So, see if you can answer any or all of these questions, or fill in the blank as needed:                                                                                        (1)  What do you call a “fish” with no eyes?  _________       (2)   Two peanuts walk into a rough biker bar.  One was__________.                                                                         (3)  A jumper cable walks into a bar.  The bartender says,  “OK, I’ll serve you,  but just don’t ________________. ”   (4)  A sandwich walks into a bar.  The bartender says,  “Sorry, we don’t serve ________  in here.”                             (5)  A dyslexic man walks into a ___________.

Now on to the first set (of four sets of ten) sentences requiring clever or punning use of an adverb.  Find the best answer for each missing adverb in the list provided.                (6)  “My Buick sedan ought to be just right to transport the    Homecoming Queen in the parade,”  bragged Tom ___________.                                                                              (7)  “What did you get on Old Lady Grisham’s spelling test?” asked Tom __________________.                                        (8)   “That cussed wind just knocked my Titleist clean over the green,”  said Tom __________________.                      (9)   “Put me down for 100 margins on heating oil,” requested Tom   _______________.                                      (10)  “Dammit,  who locked that screen door again?”  whined Tom _____________________.                              (11)  “Lemme have that last slice of American cheese, or I’ll tell Mom it was you that broke her vase,”  said Tom ________________.                                                                 (12)  “I bet I’m going to fail that math exam,  whined Tom __________________.                                                            (13)  “Buy some more IBM stock if it falls another half-point,”  demanded Tom _________________.            (14)  “Those railroad tracks could sure use some maintenance, ” observed Tom ___________________.    (15)  “I just don’t feel right about scientists going all around trying to clone everything,”  said Tom _____________.       Here is the list of adverbs to choose from and put in the blanks:  A.   unbearably    B.  craftily     C.  regally   D. testily  E. shakily     F. restrainedly    G. sheepishly   H.  quizzically    I. bullishly   J.  disgustedly

Good luck and have fun!

RJR

Advanced Warning! Blogger Approaching!

January 15, 2010

Been a bit sluggish here of late.   Don’t know a certain cure.

But, I’ll tell you one thing!   I think it  is time to lighten up this Web site.  I think I will recycle the “Tom Swiftly” material that was begun nearly three years ago now.

The more recent readers and responders among us are new to this “game.”    Those who aren’t so “fresh” likely have forgotten most or all of the material . . . .  Har!

So hold on!

RJR

Back to Athens and Rome to Find the Future?

January 13, 2010

As an avid (but ever-slower in reponding) Jeopardy fan,  I was a bit bemused a week or so ago when,  in answer to a statement about vulnerability,  one contestant came up with “Achilles’ toe,”  a second (the defending champion) came up with “Achilles’ ankle.”  The third contestant, I believe, did not attempt an answer.

As any self-respecting medical doctor or physical therapist knows, the answer is “Achilles’  __________. ”  So as not to steal your thunder (from Zeus, no doubt), you are welcome to fill in the blank.

Here, however, over the air and on to  millions of listeners and watchers was a revelation.  Too many of the graduates of our educational system are literate in two respects (reading and writing) but are woefully–and probably increasingly woeful–in their grasp of what is known as “cultural literacy.”

Doctory, on her way from home to (or back from)  her rural clinic in Tennessee,  often calls during the forty-five minute drive to chat with her mother and father.  Last Tuesday she brought up a subject that she knew would interest me.  She reported that she was concerned to find that two of her good friends did not know who “Pegasus”  was.  And they were perhaps not even knowledgeable of the hero of what for a time at least is/was five-year-old Ava’s favorite movie, a Disney classic,  Hercules.

Doctory and I bandied about a few words that derive from the Greek language and further Greek and Roman mythology/theology/culture.  Examples were “Odyssey,” “centaur,”  and “morphine.”  I observed that a knowledge of ancient history, as much as Old Testament knowledge,  was part of the total foundation of Western civilization.  And if Jenna (who has earned a degree from a Community College) and Kathryn (who is an Obstetrician/Gynecologist) have not gained at least a rudimentary knowledge of these subjects, then they have been badly deprived.

Justification # 1:  Of the first nine topics dealt with in The Dictionary of Cultural Literacy (Houghton Mifflin, by E. D. Hirsch, Jr., Joseph F. Kett, and James Trefil, all of the University of Virginia) are these four cornerstones:  The Bible, Mythology and Folklore, World Literature, Philosophy,  and Religion,  and World Literature to 1550.

Justification # 2:  Among the treasured books remaining in my home library(I donated many at retirement to the chapter of Sigma Tau Delta at UNCP and a few years later several stashes of books and documents to the Livermore Library at UNCP:  Stage Three will follow at an-as-yet-undetermined time) is Jacques Barzun’s widely acclaimed publication of ten years ago now,  From Dawn to Decadence: 1500 to the Present.  If there is a scholar-historian in our culture who could be designated a “national treasure,”  it would be this Columbia and Cambridge University Professor, who turned 102 the last day of November.  And this book, presented to me by my friend, retired Judge Maurice Braswell, whose son had previously given him a copy of that volume,  everywhere illustrates Barzun’s encyclopedic knowledge of early literature and philosophy along with his view of the eras since the “Renaissance” in Europe to our present time.   All well-written with a goodly number of apt and entertaining sidebars.

To illustrate the scope of this study,  a simple statement of fact: there are two indices in the book, one on “Persons” and the other on “Subjects,”  and each is printed in double columns for a total, roughly, of 46 pages.

When I taught World Literature I (roughly the historical period before From Dawn to Decadence begins) and sometimes perhaps also in Introduction to Literature, I would give as my first assignment a list of words derived from Greek (and sometimes Roman) mythology/theology/history and asked each student to research a certain number of the words (usually 25) and present the results on a series of index cards.  Here are some of the words that might appear:                                                                                  arachnid           atlas         aphrodisiac           cereal                      echo                  echo          fauna                     helium                    labryinth         martial      mentor                  museum                narcissism       nemesis    odyssey                 panic                      psychology      siren          volcano                  zephyr

How many do you already know something about as to origin?

Do you have others in mind that would qualify?  Not too many years ago,  for example,  I came across something of the origin of “mint,”  which I had not previously known had originated in ancient mythology.

Following my P.S. is another draft of this posting, which might be also of some passing interest. . . .

RJR                                                                                                   P.S.  If you want to give a gift that keeps on giving, you can’t go too far wrong either with The Dictionary of Cultural Literacy (there are a number of age-determined versions of this work,  and “cultural literacy” is a curriculum design that is found in schools widely) or with From Dawn to Decadence for the more advanced culturally literate.

First Draft

Doctory and I talked for a while this morning as she was driving to work in rural Tennessee and as I was between my cereal and my Eggos.

I told her that I was disappointed that “her Volunteers” had trounced “my Jayhawks” over the weekend.  She was more interested, however, in some conversation about how and why Ava became so fascinated with a Disney movie,  “Hercules,”  which I wrote a bit about in my “Sandspur” column a while back.  Then,  she was quite taken aback as to why two of her female friends seemed to be so ignorant about Greek (and Roman–they are most of the time much the same) mythology.

She seemed surprised that, in conversations  over the past weekend neither Jenna (who so far has completed her education through a Community College) and Kathryn (who had an M.D. in Gynecology/Obstetrics) had any idea about who Pegasus was.  Neither seemed to feel that a knowledge of ancient Greek culture was of much importance.

I countered,  “As if their knowledge about and  understanding of the entire foundation of Western Civilization did not matter?  Whoo Boy!” And I went on to expound for a bit about how I sought to provide some of that understanding at the very beginning of “World Literature I” (and sometimes also in an “Introduction to Literature”).  I told her about an exercise I had used over the years in which each student had to work from a list of English words derived from the Greek language (and/or Latin) that are still in common use today.

finit